What I am wearing today (21 July 2014)

Today I am wearing a mustard colored 2-button notch-lapel linen suit with a ticket pocket, a blue cotton shirt with French cuffs, a mustard/yellow/blue striped silk knit tie, a blue linen pocket square with white dots, and a pair of brown/beige Derby shoes.

 

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9 thoughts on “What I am wearing today (21 July 2014)

  1. I always enjoy your blog. You are always impeccably dressed and have a mature style. On today’s tie though, what made you choose a knit tie? Do you feel knit ties are still a viable choice?
    Thank you ~ Carl

    1. Thank you Carl for your comment and your patronage of this blog. To answer your question, you must have noticed that today’s ensemble is rather informal: linen suit, two tone Derby shoe, etc. I hope you would agree that knit ties are rather informal and goes nicely with today’s attire. About knit ties, I simply love them. And finally you may have noticed I don’t much care about fashion which is fleeting and driven by merchandising. Thanks again, shahzaman

  2. Hello Mr Shahzaman

    Spectacular, wonderful, I love the suit July 20

    I’m sending you an article of how to combine patterns
    I found it on the website. http://www.extraconfidencial.com/el mayordomo

    Hope you like it

    “How to properly combine different garments designs

    Jeeves

    Learn how to combine a plaid shirt with a tie circles or a pinstripe suit with a necktie paisley motif type is not easy by the existence of different designs. However, this should not give up on clothing introduce a degree of “risk” and style.

    Dressing properly is a learning process that takes time and requires as many other fields begin by understanding and assimilating basic concepts and gradually go deeper into those more difficult.

    The mixture of easy designs is always performed between solid colors without drawing. If you do not want to take chances, the best option, and often the most elegant remains that combines solid and smooth colors. For example, a dark gray suit or even a dark blue with a light blue shirt and a navy blue tie without drawing is always a wise and very elegant choice.

    The combination of solid colors was the general pattern until the twenties, a time characterized by the absence of any drawing on clothing. This was because only the neatness of solid colors allowed the Knights boast clean and new clothes to expose this type of design any stain however small. By contrast, shirts or ties with any type of design could hide behind them any stain that was not visible to the rest of the knights.

    Was again the Prince of Wales, Edward VIII, who broke with the establishment set up by the knights of his time and not only launched a daring dress designs but also mixed them, and with great success, together.

    While there have been very few gentlemen who, as Prince of Wales, have had the gift of making modern classic which in his time was considered almost foolhardy, most men can also get into the not infrequently shifting field blends designs without getting caught up in it.

    Although choosing whole outfit no design remains a perfectly valid option only when boxes, lines or any other design is incorporated get break the monotony and print a touch of style to the final set.

    A next level in the mixture of drawings consist opt for the same design in two garments. To do this properly the knight must ensure that the design chosen is of a different size and different design.

    For example, choosing a diplomatic suit and a striped shirt too, will have to ensure that if the stripes are substantially separate costume including shirt are very close together. Similarly, if the line is relatively wide costume he should opt for micro striped shirt and vice versa.

    This rule is perfectly extensible when combining shirts and ties. If stripes are very thin shirt, tie best be combined with it which has few scratches but visibly wider than the shirt.

    However, if you do it correctly and the result can be very flattering, it should avoid dressing as a general rule, a suit, a shirt and a striped tie them all. The result could be too heavy and forced.

    This rule advises that when mixing stripes choose a different level, it is also applicable when combining pictures or other drawings. For example, in the case of a patterned shirt with a wide view tables should avoid ties, as the Scottish, have oversized frames. In this case, it will be more convenient to opt for ties with pictures reduced in size.

    Once you know how to combine the same picture in two different garments will be ready to go a step further and introduce two different designs in the set.

    When combining two different pictures whether the suit and shirt, shirt and tie or tie and the suit will have to do just the opposite. For example, if a diplomatic suit with a plaid shirt or jacket with a tie Tweed circles dresses, clothes that have prints of a similar scale will be chosen.

    I understood how it should combine two equal and two different designs will then be able to go a step further in the exciting world of mixed designs and daring to combine three patterns where two of them have a similar drawing. To perform this combination will have to ensure that the third pattern combine with other designs independently.

    So, if you want to combine, for example, a checkered suit with a shirt of fine stripes and a tie with wide stripes will have to ensure that plaid suit combine properly and independently with both the wide stripes of tie as fine shirt.

    Once these are clear indications may start mixing three or more different prints. Thus, it could make a Giño style and try to combine, for example, a Prince of Wales suit, checked shirt and a striped tie. To avoid these cases the final look seems too forced, we must notice that neither the pattern of the suit, or the pictures of the shirt and the stripes of the tie are very wide. The average size would be ideal.

    Because you combine three or more designs is no easy task, to be sure that this is rightly doing enough to ensure that each print combined with the other two designs independently.

    While all of these keys will help you succeed with the best combination of suit, shirt and tie, there are few times where only the taste of the gentleman that first crush to see the overlay tie on the shirt and is on the suit confirm the correctness or error in the choice.

    Jeeves”

    German

    was translated with google translator

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